Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Diet

Chronic fatigue syndrome is nothing new. Symptoms associated with it have been noted since the 1800s, and outbreaks of the disease recorded sporadically throughout the last century. Nevertheless, the medical community remains confused about what actually causes the disease. One thing that’s becoming more clear, however, is the important role that diet can play in alleviating the debilitating effects of the disease.

 

A person is diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome when they are persistently and unexplainably exhausted for more than a 6-month period, as well as a host of other symptoms including sore throat, “brain fog”, and fever. The first step in improving the condition is to stabilize energy levels as much as possible. This means eating more frequently and avoiding starving yourselves for long periods. Breakfast is especially important. Foods like sugar and caffeine spike energy levels, causing them to drop later, and should be avoided as much as possible.

 

Similarly, CFS sufferers should keep track of the foods that tend to deplete energy levels. This may seem obvious, but it’s easy to be distracted in today’s high-stress, toxin-heavy world. Once you figure out what’s bad for your body, you can begin focusing on what’s good, adjusting your diet accordingly. Vegetables and healthy protein sources are a good start. Re-evaluate food cravings, and load up on snacks that are healthy and convenient at the same time.

 

Many health professionals also believe strongly in the idea of the healthy gut ecosystem. This depends on lactic-acid producing microbes in the digestive system, and ridding ourselves of things like yeast and unhealthy bacteria. What good is a healthy diet if we don’t have the means to properly process it and convert it into energy? It has also been shown that CFS patients tend to have nutritional deficiencies that may exacerbate symptoms. For that reason, it’s important to keep an eye on vitamin and nutrient levels, and to meet healthy levels through supplements, or even better, changes in diet.

 

If you or someone you know is dealing with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, good news can be hard to come by. Contact Forum Health Clarkston for information about a consultation and nutrition program that’s right for you.

 

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